Try the political quiz

3,023 Replies

@9WKWKNSfrom Ontario  answered…4mos

Depends on the circumstances. The person might be a member of a marginalized group and convicted out of hate and inequities in the society & justice system.

@9KSNBFGNew Democraticfrom British Columbia  answered…1yr

@9Z3CKQYGreenfrom Ontario  answered…1mo

Yes, after a long amount of time since their crime passes (and as long as they do not commit more crimes within that time) As long as the crime is not related to homicide or sexual assault.

@9YGCQWZLiberalfrom Nova Scotia  answered…2mos

Yes as long as they have doing there time and have being watched in what they do in office

@9WZTXQWConservativefrom Saskatchewan  answered…4mos

@9WZJGWMRhinocerosfrom Ontario  answered…4mos

@9XTLS5LRhinocerosfrom Alberta  answered…3mos

yes and no if it was very minor then yes but if it was major then no.

@9X59HCYGreenfrom Alberta  answered…4mos

Yes, as long as they have finished serving their sentence, they did not commit the crime while in office, and they have had a psych evaluation to determine if they are likely to reoffend.

@9WLKG2Qfrom British Columbia  answered…4mos

Yes, but the criminal history should be known to the public.

@9WLGRLYfrom British Columbia  answered…4mos

Yes as long as it wasn’t done while in office and it was not a, financial or sexual crime

@9WL2TTYNew Democraticfrom British Columbia  answered…4mos

Yes, as long as they have served their time and it was not financial in nature.

@9WKB2SFRhinocerosfrom Ontario  answered…5mos

No as other companies require a clean criminal record the government should aswell

@9WJKK26Bloc Québécoisfrom Alberta  answered…5mos

yes, as long as they finished there sentence and the crime wasn't committed in office

@9WJH76CRhinocerosfrom Ontario  answered…5mos

Depends on the severity of the crime and on their ability to reform. Have they reformed, and whats their plans for continuing on this proper path that theyve developed?

@9W87HPFNew Democraticfrom Alberta  answered…5mos

As long as it was not committed while in office, was no a felony, violent, financial or sexual crime, is not currently under investigation, and was not committed while in office. Politicians must be held to high standards, while recognizing that people make mistakes and individual accountability and reform should not hold someone back from public office.

@9W6KQR2Liberalfrom Alberta  answered…5mos

Yes, if their crime wasn’t related to their job and they have a record suspension.

@9W68YJPRhinocerosfrom Ontario  answered…5mos

@9W642JYCommunistfrom Quebec  answered…5mos

It depends if it is a financial gains, selling their influence for big companies, corruption and such they should be banned from politics

@9W5YDL5Greenfrom British Columbia  answered…5mos

yes, as long as they have finished serving their sentence, did not commit the crime while in office, was not a felony, violent, financial or sexual crime and have been pardoned

@9VY5Y6VConservativefrom British Columbia  answered…5mos

All depends on the crime. I believe people can rehabilitate. But I also believe that by making bad decisions you should lose some privileges

@9VXCGWSGreenfrom Alberta  answered…5mos

Situational - the time and nature of the crime need to considered. But no sexual, financial, violent crimes to be considered

@9VWF92VGreenfrom Ontario  answered…5mos

Yes, as long as it wasn't murder or a sexual crime, then they should be allowed. Most felonies are drug related, and there is no reason that someone who made a mistake when they were young should have to pay for it forever.

@9VQDXSCNew Democraticfrom Nova Scotia  answered…6mos

I feel like if a person was convicted of a drug crime there’s no reason why if they served their sentence, they couldn’t run for office.

@9VNYJC6Greenfrom British Columbia  answered…6mos

No, never. Politicians should also be prosecuted properly and not buy their way out of having to go to jail.

@9TZPYGDGreenfrom Ontario  answered…8mos

Yes, if they have shown proof of rehabilitation from that crime

@9TRL5BSRhinocerosfrom Alberta  answered…9mos

Yes, as long as the crime was not committed while in office, finished serving their sentence, and as as long as it was not a felony, violent, financial, or sexual crime

@9RGRW44People’s Partyfrom British Columbia  answered…1yr

@9RBL5DHBloc Québécoisfrom Ontario  answered…1yr

Make sure they are fit to run for office and have no other motives.

@9QRLBZXLiberalfrom Ontario  answered…1yr

I do not vote or take sides on matters involving political voting and politicians

@9QQMG3VNew Democraticfrom Ontario  answered…1yr

No. unless that crime is a petty crime, such as shoplifting as a youth... Drug Dealers should not be allowed to become Leaders. in any office.

@9Q8BZ52People’s Partyfrom Ontario  answered…1yr

Yes, as long as the crime was not related to voting, tax dollars, or hurt the country as a whole.

@9NVSNCTChristian Heritagefrom Alberta  answered…1yr

@9L93NLCLiberalfrom Alberta  answered…1yr

depending on what crime for example if it was murder or rape, then no. if it was shoplifting then maybe.

@9L3F6LZLiberalfrom Ontario  answered…1yr

@9KZ48MLRhinocerosfrom Alberta  answered…1yr

depends if they can prove that they've changed, and will use their source of power responsibly and for the greater good of the country.

@9KWB59CGreenfrom British Columbia  answered…1yr

It would depend heavily on what type of crime and how old they were

@9KVSWXTRhinocerosfrom British Columbia  answered…1yr

@9JQM4RKLiberalfrom Alberta  answered…1yr

@9HKRYVHRhinocerosfrom British Columbia  answered…1yr

Depends on the crime & the severity and if the person is trying to reform for numbers of years

@BENJAMIN-WDDConservativefrom Ontario  answered…1yr

Yes, as long as they have received a pardon, they publicly disclose their crime, and if it is not murder, a sexual crime or a financial crime.

@9H6S4PYPeople’s Partyfrom Saskatchewan  answered…1yr

@9GZFBSJRhinocerosfrom Ontario  answered…1yr

Yes, as long as they have finished serving their sentence, as long as the crime was not committed while in office, as long as it was not a felony, violent, financial, or sexual crime I think all of these

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