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@ISIDEWITHDiscuss this answer...6yrs

@ISIDEWITHDiscuss this answer...5yrs

No, but we should increase funding to offer education and skill building services for prisoners

@ISIDEWITHDiscuss this answer...6yrs

@98SL5S5New Democraticfrom British Columbia  answered…1wk

I think we should have funding go towards education and skills for prisoners and invest in reform programs rather than punishment unless the crime is horrible wrong such as first degree murder

@98SKZRBfrom British Columbia  answered…1wk

@98PQTLXfrom Ontario  answered…2wks

@98HDKKBfrom Ontario  answered…1mo

this is unfortunately not a "yes" or "no" question. it should be evaluated on an individual basis. funding education and skill building should happen regardless.

@98FPJ3Ffrom Ontario  answered…1mo

@98FPFSYLiberalfrom British Columbia  answered…1mo

Depends on what "non-violent" is classified as. If it's a crime that didn't really do a whole lot of damage, maybe that's a community service but I'm skeptical to label all "non-violent" offenses as safe to be released to the community, because that sounds like a recipe for disaster.

@98BXJ5Jfrom Alberta  answered…2mos

We should be following the same protocols norway does with their prisoners, that way there isn't such a high volume of people going back in.

@9896M6BPeople’s Partyfrom Ontario  answered…2mos

@987SXSTfrom Saskatchewan  answered…2mos

@9826SC6from Ontario  answered…2mos

@97VYMFCfrom Ontario  answered…2mos

Yes but after they’ve given time and after they’re kept on house arrest for a year or two after

@97VT9PRfrom Ontario  answered…2mos

@97TX4J6Communistfrom Alberta  answered…3mos

really it depends on what they did, if they only killed children and no one else than no (Example only)

@97T4JZCConservativefrom Ontario  answered…3mos

Yes, but after house arrest, community service, strict psychological evaluation, rehab, completing their sentence or after their parole/probation

@97529D2from Nova Scotia  answered…3mos

@96ZZ759from Manitoba  answered…3mos

@96L62C5from Ontario  answered…3mos

@96BHBSGfrom Manitoba  answered…4mos

A combination of two options listed. Yes, but they must undertake either community services, education, and or skill building services.

@95YV2DZfrom British Columbia  answered…4mos

Yes, provided they are SUPPORTED in giving back and connecting to their community.

@95YJRW3New Democraticfrom British Columbia  answered…4mos

Yes, but they must do community service for 1-2 years everyday, or be under house arrest with a electronic braclet.

@95SJ754from Ontario  answered…4mos

@95K5YQGfrom British Columbia  answered…5mos

Non-violent offenses can certainly be a range of multiple different things, so I would say to tread with caution. We should definitely be putting those with mental health/psychological issues in places where they can get help, as well as those with addiction issues as well, as if we don't they just learn from other people in prisons and jail how to become a better criminal.

@95HZSQ7from Alberta  answered…5mos

Yes, and there should be more funding towards offering education and skill building services for anyone convicted of a crime, whether they are imprisoned or not.

@95HXH63from Alberta  answered…5mos

Yes, and increase funding to offer education and skill building services for anyone convicted of a crime.

@95DH7PGfrom British Columbia  answered…5mos

@95D9LYKfrom Alberta  answered…5mos

I think that if someone is a non violent criminal, depending on what they have done, they should either be transferred to a different more respectful prison or should do lots of volunteer work.

@95D4DF4Conservativefrom Ontario  answered…5mos

No, a prisoner might appear non-violent and then go out and commit a crime again.

@95BT65Tfrom British Columbia  answered…5mos

Yes after going through a rehabilitation program to learn their mistakes.

@958PTXCfrom Alberta  answered…5mos

yes, but with supervision and mandatory pop ins by parole officer

@9566Y5Pfrom Ontario  answered…5mos

there should be more focus on rehabilitating criminals instead of locking them in jail, this will allow people to reintigrate into society and prevent the issue of overcrowding

@952MF3Zfrom British Columbia  answered…5mos

@94D87RGfrom Alberta  answered…5mos

They should be sentenced using Restorative Justice to best benefit the community and prevent recidivism

@94C42JLfrom British Columbia  answered…5mos

Non-violent prisoners can mean a whole lot of different criminal offences, many of which aren't fit to be in the community for public safety reasons alone. I would say it's much better to direct them to where they need the most help, be that a mental hospital/ward, addiction center or therapy, but at the same time, prison still needs to be an option as some may not respond well to the help/efforts at rehabilitation.

@94B8ZS9Liberalfrom Ontario  answered…6mos

@4MYTQMW answered…6mos

No, but we should decriminalize drugs and reduce the stigma around employing ex-convicts with non-violent histories reduce overcrowding

@93RQL4H from Massachusetts answered…7mos

Yes, especially those who are only in jail for possession of marijuana.

@93P275PLiberalfrom Ontario  answered…7mos

For non-violent criminals, we will put them in rehabilitation centres.

 @93G2RP7 from Wisconsin answered…7mos

Release all prisoners who are in incarcerated for victimless crimes

@93FG53Gfrom British Columbia  answered…8mos

Depends on what "non-violent offences" mean, as it is a very broad category that encompasses all kinds of offences. If they're a drug addict, they shouldn't be in jail and should be getting treatment.

@8ZPHR88 from Colorado answered…8mos

Yes, but we should abolish the current prison system in favor of restorative justice system.

@92YHQCV from California answered…8mos

Yes, but they must perform community service on a daily basis while being placed under house arrest with an electronic bracelet

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